Ways of Reading – Kobo

When I decided to eread, I went, without research or review, to Kobo. I chose Kobo as I am a fan of Chapters and they are linked. So, the reader was chosen based on the bricks and mortar store. Go figure. As a Canadian, it’s been nice using a reader that works well in Canada and as a reader it’s been easy to use. This post is a look at how Kobo works in a few formats, including options I enjoy and wishes I have for each app.

I don’t own a e-reader. I carry around enough in my purse that to add in another device would just be overkill. Instead I read on my ipad mini. I also have kobo on my Android (Samsung Galaxy 5) phone. This one is set up to access the

My current reading library. Note all the circles with arrows - they are books that need to be downloaded.

My current reading library. Note all the circles with arrows – they are books that need to be downloaded.

account my son uses, just in case he runs out of books and doesn’t have anything else while we’re out and about. It has come in handy. There are some differences in the apps, nothing major but enough for me to notice. I’ve taken screen shot from both – the one with all the 39 clues books is from my phone, the one with all of the obviously summer relaxation reading is my ipad.

When you open up a kobo app, you are greeted with your library. This is a list of books (and magazines and other reading materials) you have purchased from kobo. You can add other books you have obtained in pdf form to your library, but you are primarily limited to

Menu, including store access on android.

Menu, including store access on android.

books from kobo. In the iPad app, you cannot access the store (or, if you can, I can’t figure it out and it’s something I’ve looked for!). You can access the store in the android app by accessing the home menu. If you are using your iPad, you have to purchase from the website. Once book are purchased,the next time you access your app, the covers for the books will appear in your library. They will have a small grey circle in the bottom right corner. You touch that and it begins downloading. You will need access to the internet for this to happen. When you download a book it will take up space on your device so you’ll have to make decisions on what is kept in your library. If you’re reading a book for class, keep it there once you have finished it. If you’re reading for pleasure, you can ‘close and remove’ books once finished. To do this is different on both android and iPad. Android asked you if you want to close the book. You then need to select the cover by holding down on it and choose remove – either from device (which means you can download it again later) or from library (which means you don’t have it anymore). Personally, I take advantage of the removing it from device on either platform. Makes it easier to access books I want to read again without taking up space on my device. You can keep as many books as you want in your library; it’s all about the space on your reading device. I tend to download a large number of books when I travel in case I don’t have wi-fi in my hotel and don’t want to use up roaming data. Otherwise, I tend to just have the book I have reading housed in my library.

You can personalize a kobo to look how you want. I personally pick a black background, the smallest font and then bump up the brightness. Each option was chosen based on my reading style and my eyes – the black background is the easiest on them.

Picking the colours

Picking the colours

You can choose from a variety of different options in ipad and can choose from three options in android, but really, it’ll come down to personal preference – like your books paper coloured? Sepia or White? Want it darker? Play around and figure out what works best for your eyes. You can also chance options such as how your page turns and how big you want your text. I keep it small but find there are some books that are not set up for a small font – the lines overlap, the words merge. Upping the font helps with this. Kobo has lots of options for your personal preferences, both with android and iPad. If you are new to e-reading, you need to determine what you like.

In the iPad app, there are options given to highlight and make notes in your book. I’ve used this when teaching – put notes in and then put it on the board, or simply use it while teaching. It has replaced my post it notes from years past.20140831-200527-72327919.jpg

To make notes, you simply highlight the word or phrase you want to make note of and a menu will appear. This gives you the option to add a note or to highlight. You can even choose the colour of your highlighting if you’re picky about that kind of thing. Given that I used to use specific coloured post-its for different factors in a novel (characters, conflict, symbolism, etc), different highlighting colours is perfect. Kobo allows you to keep your notes private or make them public – if public, anyone reading the book can access them. You can also choose to read notes others make public – I stopped doing that when too many squeeing fans exclaimed when their favourite character appeared again, but do find myself turning that option back on when I am reading a classic I am teaching.  wpid-screenshot_2014-08-31-19-44-52.pngYou can also search for phrases; kobo will search the web and their built in dictionary to help your understanding. This is very useful, especially when books make reference to historical figures and events that are less than familiar to you. I’ve used this several times when reading historical fiction and non fiction. You will need access to the internet for this option, so if you are on a plane or you are out of data, it won’t help.

One nice thing about kobo is that it gives you awards based on your reading. They have 20140831-200527-72327383.jpgthirty eight different awards, from ‘Book Lover’ to ‘I eat books for lunch’. I have earned all but five of them. It’s a nice little perk when you start out using the kobo – having notifications pop up stating that you won an award is fantastic. As well, Kobo keeps track of your stats – you can take a look at 20140831-200526-72326853.jpghow much you are reading, the types of media you read, how long it takes you to read a book and other such stats. If you are like me and like to know how much you read (I’m doing a reading challenge) this is fantastic. I especially like to see how many pages I’ve turned – right now it’s over a million and I’ve only been e-reading since the end of November 2013. With the awards and the stats, Kobo has set itself up to give positive reinforcement to their users – if you can measure your reading through awards and positive stats, you might feel good enough about it all to keep using their product.

Kobo is my main choice for an e-reader and I use it extensively. One account option that works nicely for me is that I can add a children’s account – my son has an account linked to mine and to which I add money for him to buy books. I get the receipt when he does that so I can keep track of what he’s doing. However, I do not like that I cannot share books with him – if there is a book I’ve read that I’d like him to read he either has to use my device or we have to purchase it again. However, this is something I can hope for in the future. As for now, my e-library is always with me and I am adding to it constantly. I do wish the iPad option had links to the store and the android option had more options for adding notes; between the two they make a great app. Both apps were free and easily available. you also have the option of reading on your computer, if that is your preferred option. There are often coupon codes and promotions that direct me to books I had never previously considered or heard of. All in all, the switch to kobo was a positive one and one from which I have not looked back.

 

 

 

ROBOT – Review One Book on Thursday – Blind by Rachel DeWoskin

The book I’ve chosen this week is ‘Blind’ by Rachel DeWoskin. In this novel the main character Emma has been blinded by a freak firework accident. She has been blind for around a year and has decided to  be mainstreamed back into her old school with her old friends. Friends she grew up with and who knew her before the loss of her sight. However, one friend is not returning to school  – a member of their school community has been found dead, suspected suicide. Emma has to learn to deal with being blind as well as learn to deal with her grief and confusion over the death of her friend.

Losing a sense is a terrifying idea. Losing a sense in a freak accident while surrounded by your

family – those people who love and protect you – is even more terrifying. As a parent, the idea my son could lose something like his sight while standing with me scares me. Emma has to deal with the idea that the people who she always trusted to protect her were unable to keep her from such a negative life change. Emma has five sisters – one who is a baby – and one brother, and parents who love her and worry about her safety at all times, especially now. Her best friend Logan has her sight but does not have a supportive family who looks out for her; this is an issue with the girls and one that is never resolved. Logan is very supportive of Emma as she re-mainstreams, as is Leah. In fact, her whole family, other than her sister Sarah are supportive and do what they can to help her adjust to her new life. As Emma continues through her year, she learns more about what it means to be a friend, a sister and a daughter, as well as what it means to be a blind person in a sighted world.

The title of Blind is double edged. Emma is a good person but she is blind to the needs of others. She sees, so to speak, just what is related to her life and not what is happening in the lives in others. This is a realization she comes to  herself, as she gets past the physical changes in her life and begins to realize the emotional. As a character she develops and changes from someone stuck in her own physical changes into someone who can feel and emote about the emotional needs of others. this change is helped along with the examination of the suicide of her classmate. Emma is forced to look externally and see her role in the world bigger than the loss of her eyesight.

I really liked this book. it presented a realistic view of what a nice, smart, caring teenager would go through if presented with such a freak accident. Reading as she learns how to both physically and emotionally cope with her world is a a story that is told in a realistic and gripping way. Relationships are hard at any age and when you throw in a major physical change, they become even tougher. Having Emma become blind, allows for the metaphor of emotional blindness to shine through and makes her journey to being a better person a more satisfying one for the reader. For me, it is her relationship with Sarah that is the lynchpin -once she realizes more about Sarah, Emma is able to know more about herself. At times there was a lot going on however, that seemed appropriate to the lives of the characters.

I would recommend this book to those who enjoy reality novels and like to watch the development of a character in to someone who is emotionally mature. In addition, anyone who has experience with people who have vision issues will appreciate the struggles faced by Emma and her family.

I read this book on my Kobo, finishing it August 26th. It was published August 7th, 2014 by Viking Junior, ISBN 9780670785223.

Healthy Living and apps of mine

dropzone

Me, after rappelling the nine stories of Atlantic Place during an Easter Seals Fundraiser.

One of the last things I said to a fellow teacher was that this summer was going to be my summer. I was going to be well rested, get super healthy and get fit. I had plans, such plans.
So, rested didn’t happen – my family and I have been all over the province. I’ve rappelled down a building for goodness sake! Rested didn’t really happen. Oh well, I can sleep eventually, right?

 

Healthy and fit…. well, that started. I have to admit, there were some holidays taken where wings and pizza were on the menu – it’s a good thing the Bonavista Social Club isn’t closer to my house. However, with the use of some apps, I’ve gotten to push myself health and fitness wise and go farther than I would have imagined. You should note that I mention these apps for my samsung phone; fitbit is the same for my iPad and I am positive that Apple would have a comparable app for c25k and s health.

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Fitbit tracker – whoops – gotta charge it soon!

A gift that I was given was a fitbit. if you’ve ever wondered how much and far you walk every day, a fitbit will help you out. I have the “one”, a fitbit that can track not just my steps but my stairs, my sleep and with the app, give me a space to track water and any weight goals I have. I find it fun to see how much I walk in a day – there are days that seem super active and yet I only walk 7000 steps. There are days I know are full and the fit bit at the end of the day shows that yes, I walked 14000 steps. One hike we took this summer was equal to 49 sets of stairs! The days that are lower but feel like they should be more I analyze- was there are lot of walking from sitting to sitting, was the day more active mentally and that’s why I’m tired? I not-so-secretly have the goal of doing a workout that alone reaches my goal of 10000 steps per day. However, that will come. Right now I think my record is 9000 steps during a workout. Not so shabby and I know it because of my fitbit.

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S Health Tracker

Yet, if you don’t want to pay the money, chances are if you have a smart phone you have a step counter and fitness encourager. My phone is a samsung galaxy and came with S Health. It’s a great step counter – and gives you encouragement as you go – but you do need to be walking with your phone. It doesn’t do as much as fitbit, but has been great for those days when I forget my fitbit at home but want to keep track of my steps. I do like hearing it triumphantly trumpet when I meet my step goals.

 

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My next workout!

But running. How running? I have always envied runners their ease of exercise – they look so graceful and strong running with serious faces. I have always been more of a yoga/swimmer/climber/jillian-michaels-victim. This summer I tried running. I decided that I needed a coach of some sort and most programs were not at good times – being a teacher, you don’t get to do stuff at the same times as others. In this case, I wanted to run at 8am as many mornings as possible. I was not pushing enough – I was letting myself walk more than I should. So I downloaded a Couch to 5K app. You can get any number of paid versions. I, however, choose the free version of the Zen Labs C25K. It’s fantastic – it pushes me to run longer but gives me walking time to recover. I can use a playlist of my own music in the background, while a pleasant voice tells me when to walk and run. AND, in case I don’t hear it, my phone will vibrate. I can choose whatever workout I want and when I finish it will tweet or update my facebook status for me if I wish (I have not opted to do this). You can get a paid version with no ads, but the ads don’t bug me, so I haven’t upgraded. For those hoping to put some fitness into their school week, this is a great app to help push you into running. I’m still not very good – I am quite slow – but my endurance is building up and I’m thrilled by that!

So, as the school year begins, I will have to find new ways to make these apps work with me. If you see me taking laps around my classroom, you’ll know why! I encourage anyone who wants to explore healthier options to check out what they can do with their phones/ipads/tech. I know that my eyes have been opened by my technologies and what they tell me!

 

 

ROBOT – Review One Book On Thursday – ‘Say What You Will’ by Cammie McGovern

This is the first in what will hopefully be a long line of Thursday Book Reviews. My focus will be on Young Adult Literature, with perhaps some Adult literature that has appeal to young adults in general. Please note that all opinions are mine and based on my feelings when I read the book – your experience may vary.

Say What you Will Cover

Cover taken from Goodreads

The book I have chosen to review is ‘Say What you Will’ by Cammie McGovern. This book was marketed to readers of John Green and Rainbow Rowell, two authors I enjoy. This book is the Young Adult Debut of McGovern, an author who has previously published books geared to an older audience. This book is about love, loss and learning to communicate.

Amy was born with Cerebral Palsy. She cannot walk without a walker and relies on a voice box to verbally communicate with others. She has always been the smartest student in the class, however socially, she’s lagging behind her peers. Matthew has obsessive-compulsive disorder. His life has been ruled by fear, rituals and repeated thoughts that distract him from being able to live a full life. Amy and Matthew both live in the world but are unable to fully be a part of it.

In a bid to make friends, Amy convinces her parents to hire student aides to accompany her to classes and help her in school. This role is usually filled by adults in her life, further isolating her from her peers. She convinces Matthew to apply and in doing so begins a journey that neither of them could have ever anticipated.

This story is told partly in a series of messages between Amy and Matthew with narrative interjections in between messages to explain the characters thoughts and actions and partly in narrative form. We are told the story from both perspectives, learning more about what each feels about the developing relationship. We also learn more about their past, including how Amy has been treated in the school system and how Matthew began to develop his rituals. This all helps us understand how they develop their relationship and why they need each other more than they think. As their relationship takes an unexpected turn, we see how the love that they have that was so difficult to develop is so well deserved and hard won.

The characters in this novel – not just Amy and Matthew but all of the characters, including the other student helpers, other classmates and the parents – are nicely developed. Even if you do not agree with their decisions and even if they do not seem like great character development displays, you understand why they made the decisions they did. The juxtaposition of the two main characters – Amy who would love to speak but cannot and Matthew who can speak but doesn’t – is a beautiful one, as the character that you assume would be weak is the strongest of the two. There are many lessons in here for everyone, in terms of examining how you live your life and what is important to you.

At times the story seems unbelievable. There are plot twists that are questionable or feel as if they have simplified the situation (in making it complicated). This book is very situational and character driven and thus, with the plot issues you are reminded how people make bad decisions in their quest to be independent and mature; that no matter how mature these characters seemed, they are still teens learning their way through life.

Readers who enjoyed ‘Eleanor and Park’ or ‘Looking for Alaska’ might enjoy this novel.

I read this book on my Kobo App for iPad on June 8th, 2014. It was published by Harpur Teen on June 3rd, 2014. ISBN 9780062271129.